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Tips and Tricks site for advanced HP-UX Engineers
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30 Nov 17 No downtme migration of mounted filesystem to new storage type

On LVM 1.0 Volume group, the task is no downtime storage migration.
 Hitachi to Pure Solid State storage. Mirror/UX required.
 Disks are almostthe same size:

dbrestore:root > diskinfo /dev/rdisk/disk42
 SCSI describe of /dev/rdisk/disk42:
 vendor: HITACHI
 product id: OPEN-V
 type: direct access
 size: 16777216 Kbytes
 bytes per sector: 512
 dbrestore:root > diskinfo /dev/rdisk/disk52
 SCSI describe of /dev/rdisk/disk52:
 vendor: PURE
 product id: FlashArray
 type: direct access
 size: 10485760 Kbytes
 bytes per sector: 512

pvcreate /dev/rdisk/disk52
 vgextend /dev/vgtest /dev/disk/disk52

Before state:
 dbrestore:root > vgdisplay -v vgtest
 --- Volume groups ---
 VG Name /dev/vgtest
 VG Write Access read/write
 VG Status available
 Max LV 255
 Cur LV 1
 Open LV 1
 Max PV 16
 Cur PV 2
 Act PV 2
 Max PE per PV 4095
 VGDA 4
 PE Size (Mbytes) 4
 Total PE 6654
 Alloc PE 1024
 Free PE 5630
 Total PVG 0
 Total Spare PVs 0
 Total Spare PVs in use 0
 VG Version 1.0
 VG Max Size 262080m
 VG Max Extents 65520

--- Logical volumes ---
 LV Name /dev/vgtest/lvtest
 LV Status available/syncd
 LV Size (Mbytes) 4096
 Current LE 1024
 Allocated PE 1024
 Used PV 1

--- Physical volumes ---
 PV Name /dev/disk/disk42
 PV Status available
 Total PE 4095
 Free PE 4095
 Autoswitch On
 Proactive Polling On

PV Name /dev/disk/disk52
 PV Status available
 Total PE 2559
 Free PE 1535
 Autoswitch On
 Proactive Polling On

dbrestore:root > ioscan -NfnCdisk /dev/disk/disk42
 Class I H/W Path Driver S/W State H/W Type Description
 ===================================================================
 disk 42 64000/0xfa00/0x21 esdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HITACHI OPEN-V
 /dev/disk/disk42 /dev/rdisk/disk42
 dbrestore:root > ioscan -NfnCdisk /dev/disk/disk52
 Class I H/W Path Driver S/W State H/W Type Description
 ===================================================================
 disk 52 64000/0xfa00/0x35 esdisk CLAIMED DEVICE PURE FlashArray
 /dev/disk/disk52 /dev/rdisk/disk52
 dbrestore:root > bdf | grep test
 /dev/vgtest/lvtest 4194304 19544 3913845 0% /test
 dbrestore:root > lvdisplay -v /dev/vgtest/lvtest
 --- Logical volumes ---
 LV Name /dev/vgtest/lvtest
 VG Name /dev/vgtest
 LV Permission read/write
 LV Status available/syncd
 Mirror copies 0
 Consistency Recovery MWC
 Schedule parallel
 LV Size (Mbytes) 4096
 Current LE 1024
 Allocated PE 1024
 Stripes 0
 Stripe Size (Kbytes) 0
 Bad block on
 Allocation strict
 IO Timeout (Seconds) default

--- Distribution of logical volume ---
 PV Name LE on PV PE on PV
 /dev/disk/disk42 1024 1024

--- Logical extents ---
 LE PV1 PE1 Status 1
 00000 /dev/disk/disk42 00000 current
 00001 /dev/disk/disk42 00001 current
 00002 /dev/disk/disk42 00002 current
 ...
 01022 /dev/disk/disk42 01022 current
 01023 /dev/disk/disk42 01023 current

dbrestore:root > lvextend -m 1 /dev/vgtest/lvtest /dev/disk/disk52
 The newly allocated mirrors are now being synchronized.This operation will
 take some time. Please wait ....
 Logical volume "/dev/vgtest/lvtest" has been successfully extended.
 Volume Group configuration for /dev/vgtest has been saved in /etc/lvmconf/vgtest.conf
 dbrestore:root > lvdisplay -v /dev/vgtest/lvtest
 --- Logical volumes ---
 LV Name /dev/vgtest/lvtest
 VG Name /dev/vgtest
 LV Permission read/write
 LV Status available/syncd
 Mirror copies 1
 Consistency Recovery MWC
 Schedule parallel
 LV Size (Mbytes) 4096
 Current LE 1024
 Allocated PE 2048
 Stripes 0
 Stripe Size (Kbytes) 0
 Bad block on
 Allocation strict
 IO Timeout (Seconds) default

--- Distribution of logical volume ---
 PV Name LE on PV PE on PV
 /dev/disk/disk42 1024 1024
 /dev/disk/disk52 1024 1024

--- Logical extents ---
 LE PV1 PE1 Status 1 PV2 PE2 Status 2
 00000 /dev/disk/disk42 00000 current /dev/disk/disk52 00000 current
 00001 /dev/disk/disk42 00001 current /dev/disk/disk52 00001 current
 00002 /dev/disk/disk42 00002 current /dev/disk/disk52 00002 current
 ...
 01023 /dev/disk/disk42 01023 current /dev/disk/disk52 01023 current

dbrestore:root > bdf | grep test
 /dev/vgtest/lvtest 4194304 19544 3913845 0% /test
 dbrestore:root > lvreduce -m 0 /dev/vgtest/lvtest /dev/disk/disk42
 Logical volume "/dev/vgtest/lvtest" has been successfully reduced.
 Volume Group configuration for /dev/vgtest has been saved in /etc/lvmconf/vgtest.conf
 dbrestore:root > bdf | grep test
 /dev/vgtest/lvtest 4194304 19544 3913845 0% /test
 dbrestore:root > lvdisplay -v /dev/vgtest/lvtest
 --- Logical volumes ---
 LV Name /dev/vgtest/lvtest
 VG Name /dev/vgtest
 LV Permission read/write
 LV Status available/syncd
 Mirror copies 0
 Consistency Recovery MWC
 Schedule parallel
 LV Size (Mbytes) 4096
 Current LE 1024
 Allocated PE 1024
 Stripes 0
 Stripe Size (Kbytes) 0
 Bad block on
 Allocation strict
 IO Timeout (Seconds) default

--- Distribution of logical volume ---
 PV Name LE on PV PE on PV
 /dev/disk/disk52 1024 1024

--- Logical extents ---
 LE PV1 PE1 Status 1
 00000 /dev/disk/disk52 00000 current
 00001 /dev/disk/disk52 00001 current

...
 01023 /dev/disk/disk52 01023 current

dbrestore:root > bdf | grep test
 /dev/vgtest/lvtest 4194304 19544 3913845 0% /test
 dbrestore:root >

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29 Oct 14 Puzzle of the day. Strict logical volume prevents you from extending a filesystem

Thanks to Veerappan Dhandapani of HCL Technologies for bringing me this problem

You have 50 GB free in the volume group.

You try to extend the logical volume and you cant.

Basics:

1) bdf is the tool for measuring filesystem size not logical volume size

2)lvdisplay is the tool for measuring logical volume size.

Steps:

1) Extend the logical volume. That is why the previous two number points are important. In process after extending the logical volume size the lv size and file system size are not equal

2) Extend the file system.

root@mybox# vgdisplay -v vgdata | grep -i “Free PE”
Free PE 1784
Free PE 511
Free PE 0
Free PE 0
Free PE 0
Free PE 0
Free PE 1273
Free PE 0

root@mybox# lvdisplay /dev/vgdata/lv_prod_datastaging
— Logical volumes —
LV Name /dev/vgdata/lv_prod_datastaging
VG Name /dev/vgdata
LV Permission read/write
LV Status available/syncd
Mirror copies 0
Consistency Recovery MWC
Schedule parallel
LV Size (Mbytes) 245760
Current LE 7680
Allocated PE 7680
Stripes 0
Stripe Size (Kbytes) 0
Bad block on
Allocation PVG-strict
IO Timeout (Seconds) default

root@mybox# lvextend -L 278528 /dev/vgdata/lv_prod_datastaging
lvextend: Not enough free physical extents available.

The problem here is the allocation policy.

lvchange -C n -s n /dev/vgdata/lv_prod_datastaging

See the man page for details. -C is for contiguous -s is for strict allocation.

We changed both to n(o).

Off camera we extended the logcal volume

lvdisplay /dev/vgdata/lv_prod_datastaging

— Logical volumes —
LV Name                     /dev/vgdata/lv_prod_datastaging
VG Name                     /dev/vgdata
LV Permission               read/write
LV Status                   available/syncd
Mirror copies               0
Consistency Recovery        MWC
Schedule                    parallel
LV Size (Mbytes)            302848
Current LE                  9464
Allocated PE                9464
Stripes                     0
Stripe Size (Kbytes)        0
Bad block                   on
Allocation                  non-strict
IO Timeout (Seconds)        default

We get the size from the logical volume size to feed into the Online JFS extend command so we do not have to do math.

fsadm -F vxfs -b 302848m /prod/datastaging

bdfmegs is Bill Hassell’s new and improved bdf

/var/adm/bin/bdfmegs /prod/datastaging
File-System                      Mbytes    Used   Avail %Used Mounted on
/dev/vgdata/lv_prod_datastaging   310.1g  215.7g   94.0g  70% /prod/datastaging

 

 

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27 Jan 14 Fixing an inconsistent volume group with no downtime

I recently encountered a volume group that was part legacy devices, part dsf agile.
root@protterdbsvr1:/root/shuffle> vgdisplay -v vgprotter
--- Volume groups ---
VG Name                     /dev/vgprotter
VG Write Access             read/write
VG Status                   available
Max LV                      2047
Cur LV                      15
Open LV                     15
Cur Snapshot LV             0
Max PV                      2048
Cur PV                      11
Act PV                      11
Max PE per PV               65536
VGDA                        22
PE Size (Mbytes)            16
Unshare unit size (Kbytes)  1024
Total PE                    48004
Alloc PE                    46765
Current pre-allocated PE    0
Free PE                     1239
Total PVG                   0
Total Spare PVs             0
Total Spare PVs in use      0
VG Version                  2.2
VG Max Size                 1t
VG Max Extents              65536
Cur Snapshot Capacity       0p
Max Snapshot Capacity       1t
   --- Logical volumes ---
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlbin
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            20000
   Current LE                  1250
   Allocated PE                1250
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqladmin
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            4000
   Current LE                  250
   Allocated PE                250
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlctrl1
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            512
   Current LE                  32
   Allocated PE                32
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlctrl2
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            512
   Current LE                  32
   Allocated PE                32
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqldata1
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            550000
   Current LE                  34375
   Allocated PE                34375
   Used PV                     10
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqldiag
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            4000
   Current LE                  250
   Allocated PE                250
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlexport
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            70000
   Current LE                  4375
   Allocated PE                4375
   Used PV                     5
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlindex1
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            30000
   Current LE                  1875
   Allocated PE                1875
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlredo1
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            10000
   Current LE                  625
   Allocated PE                625
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlredo2
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            10000
   Current LE                  625
   Allocated PE                625
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlsystem
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            7200
   Current LE                  450
   Allocated PE                450
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqltemp
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            20000
   Current LE                  1250
   Allocated PE                1250
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqltools
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            1008
   Current LE                  63
   Allocated PE                63
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlundo
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            20000
   Current LE                  1250
   Allocated PE                1250
   Used PV                     1
   LV Name                     /dev/vgprotter/sqlusers
   LV Status                   available/syncd
   LV Size (Mbytes)            1008
   Current LE                  63
   Allocated PE                63
   Used PV                     1
 
   --- Physical volumes ---
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c3t1d6
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c5t1d6  Alternate Link
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c3t1d7
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c5t1d7  Alternate Link
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c3t2d0
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c5t2d0  Alternate Link
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c3t2d1
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c5t2d1  Alternate Link
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c3t2d2
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c5t2d2  Alternate Link
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/disk/disk220
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/disk/disk221
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/disk/disk222
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/disk/disk223
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/disk/disk224
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     0
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On
   PV Name                     /dev/disk/disk225
   PV Status                   available
   Total PE                    4364
   Free PE                     1239
   Current pre-allocated PE    0
   Autoswitch                  On
   Proactive Polling           On

The issue is that two different technologies, alternate link and native multipathing are in use in the same volume group.

The volume group was working but might have maintenance issues down the road. Plus I personally found it darn confusing.
  PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c3t2d2
   PV Name                     /dev/dsk/c5t2d2  Alternate Link
 
The fix:
vgextend vgprotter /dev/disk/disk53
echo $?
0
vgreduce vgprotter /dev/dsk/c3t2d2
echo $?
0
vgreduce vgprotter /dev/dsk/c5t2d2
echo $?
0
We check the return code to make sure the operation was a success. Repeat for each legacy device.
No downtime though for prodcution systems I recommend working with a change request under your organizations policy.

What id looks like after we are done:

root@
protterdbsvr1:/root> vgdisplay -v vgprotter
--- Volume groups ---
VG Name /dev/vgprotter
VG Write Access read/write
VG Status available
Max LV 2047
Cur LV 15
Open LV 15
Cur Snapshot LV 0
Max PV 2048
Cur PV 11
Act PV 11
Max PE per PV 65536
VGDA 22
PE Size (Mbytes) 16
Unshare unit size (Kbytes) 1024
Total PE 48004
Alloc PE 46765
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Free PE 1239
Total PVG 0
Total Spare PVs 0
Total Spare PVs in use 0
VG Version 2.2
VG Max Size 1t
VG Max Extents 65536
Cur Snapshot Capacity 0p
Max Snapshot Capacity 1t
--- Logical volumes ---
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlbin
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 20000
Current LE 1250
Allocated PE 1250
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqladmin
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 4000
Current LE 250
Allocated PE 250
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlctrl1
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 512
Current LE 32
Allocated PE 32
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlctrl2
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 512
Current LE 32
Allocated PE 32
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqldata1
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 550000
Current LE 34375
Allocated PE 34375
Used PV 10
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqldiag
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 4000
Current LE 250
Allocated PE 250
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlexport
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 70000
Current LE 4375
Allocated PE 4375
Used PV 5
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlindex1
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 30000
Current LE 1875
Allocated PE 1875
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlredo1
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 10000
Current LE 625
Allocated PE 625
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlredo2
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 10000
Current LE 625
Allocated PE 625
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlsystem
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 7200
Current LE 450
Allocated PE 450
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqltemp
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 20000
Current LE 1250
Allocated PE 1250
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqltools
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 1008
Current LE 63
Allocated PE 63
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlundo
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 20000
Current LE 1250
Allocated PE 1250
Used PV 1
LV Name /dev/vgprotter/sqlusers
LV Status available/syncd
LV Size (Mbytes) 1008
Current LE 63
Allocated PE 63
Used PV 1
 
--- Physical volumes ---
PV Name /dev/disk/disk220
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk221
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk222
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk223
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk224
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk225
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 1239
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk57
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk56
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk55
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk54
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On
PV Name /dev/disk/disk53
PV Status available
Total PE 4364
Free PE 0
Current pre-allocated PE 0
Autoswitch On
Proactive Polling On

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05 Jul 11 VxVM replace boot disk

Create a partition description file

(Need to update the EFI and HPSP size below according to the other root disk partition’s size)
This examples is where the new disk is disk85. Applies only to HP-UX 11.31 with VxVM as boot drive manager.

# vi /tmp/efipart

3
EFI 500MB
HPUX 100%
HPSP 400MB

Use the idisk(1M) command to partition the disk according to this file
# idisk -wf /tmp/efipart /dev/rdisk/disk85

Write EFI info to the EFI partition on the disk
# mkboot -e -l /dev/rdisk/disk85

Confirm the AUTO file entry is intact It should be  “boot vmunix”
# efi_cp -d /dev/rdisk/disk85_p1 -u /EFI/HPUX/AUTO /tmp/efi; cat /tmp/efi

If found any difference, edit /tmp/efi file  as below to update the entry “boot vmunix”
#echo “boot vmunix ” > /tmp/efi

Update auto file
#efi_cp -d /dev/rdisk/disk85_p1 /tmp/efi /EFI/HPUX/AUTO

Confirm the AUTO file entry again, It should be  “boot vmunix”
# efi_cp -d /dev/rdisk/disk85_p1 -u /EFI/HPUX/AUTO /tmp/efi; cat /tmp/efi

Initialize the disk as VXVM  boot disk

#### vxdisksetup -iB disk85_p2  ((lives in etc vx bin slashes removed due to Word Press error))

Add the disk to the existing rootdg
# vxdg -g rootdg adddisk rootdisk02=disk85_p2

Write Volume Manager volume information to the LABEL file:
# /opt/VRTS/bin/vxbootsetup rootdisk02

Display the LIF and Volume Manager label information:
# vxvmboot -v /dev/rdisk/disk85

Check the Mirror status  ( Each volume should be with two plex )
$ vxprint –htg rootdg |egrep –i “^v|^pl”

 

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20 May 10 clean up procedure after ignite replication of hpvm host

This errror is created by Ignite replication of an hpvm system. The following checks device integrity and cleans up errors created by Ignite replication.

hpvmcreate: ERROR (jdeautp1): Incorrect backing device type.

First check for errors with this script (I may check this in at some point)

#!/usr/bin/sh
#
# Unofficial quick and dirty passthru DSF check script
#
# It walks all /dev/pt/* files and tries to find corresponding /dev/rdisk
# or /dev/rtape files. If they are foudn their minor numbers are compared.
#
# @(#) pt_check.sh v1.1 – stanm@wtec
#

for i in $(ls /dev/pt/*)
do
# ll $i
shortname=${i##*_}
printf “checking $shortname”
minor1=$(ll $i|awk ‘{print $6}’)
# echo minor1=$minor ($i)
if [ -c /dev/rdisk/$shortname ]; then
minor2=$(ll /dev/rdisk/$shortname|awk ‘{print $6}’)
# echo minor2=$minor2 ($/dev/rdisk/$shortname)
if [[ “x$minor1” = “x$minor2″ ]]; then
printf ” – OK\n”
else
printf ” – Minor numbers are probably incorrect\n”
printf “minor1=$minor1 ($i) vs ”
printf “minor2=$minor2 (/dev/rdisk/$shortname)\n”
fi
else
# could be tape
if [ -c /dev/rtape/${shortname}_BEST ]; then
minor2=$(ll /dev/rtape/${shortname}_BEST|awk ‘{print $6}’)
if [[ “x$minor1” = “x$minor2″ ]]; then
printf ” – OK\n”
else
printf ” – Minor numbers are probably incorrect\n”
printf “minor1=$minor1 ($i) vs ”
printf “minor2=$minor2 (/dev/rtape/${shortname}_BEST)\n”
fi
else
printf ” – /dev/rdisk/$shortname or /dev/rtape/${shortname}_BEST not found – check skipped\n”
fi
fi
done

Output indicating problems:

checking disk11 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000005 (/dev/pt/pt_disk11) vs minor2=0x000008 (/dev/rdisk/disk11)
checking disk12 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000006 (/dev/pt/pt_disk12) vs minor2=0x000009 (/dev/rdisk/disk12)
checking disk13 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000007 (/dev/pt/pt_disk13) vs minor2=0x00000a (/dev/rdisk/disk13)
checking disk14 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000008 (/dev/pt/pt_disk14) vs minor2=0x00000b (/dev/rdisk/disk14)
checking disk15 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000009 (/dev/pt/pt_disk15) vs minor2=0x00000c (/dev/rdisk/disk15)
checking disk17 – OK
checking disk18 – /dev/rdisk/disk18 or /dev/rtape/disk18_BEST not found – check skipped
checking disk19 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000017 (/dev/pt/pt_disk19) vs minor2=0x000013 (/dev/rdisk/disk19)
checking disk2 – OK
checking disk22 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000018 (/dev/pt/pt_disk22) vs minor2=0x000014 (/dev/rdisk/disk22)
checking disk23 – Minor numbers are probably incorrect
minor1=0x000019 (/dev/pt/pt_disk23) vs minor2=0x000015 (/dev/rdisk/disk23)
checking disk3 – OK
checking disk5 – OK
checking disk8 – /dev/rdisk/disk8 or /dev/rtape/disk8_BEST not found – check skipped
checking disk9 – /dev/rdisk/disk9 or /dev/rtape/disk9_BEST not found – check skipped

Correction procedure:

cd /var/opt/hpvm/common/

rm -f hpvm_devinit
cd /dev/pt
ls
rm -f *
hpvmdevmgmt -I

Consider this a necessary procedure to clean up after ignite replication

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11 Feb 10 EMC based system I/O layout tool

This tool is called syslayout.sh

It works on superdome and rp8420 systems. It requires the EMC utility inq be installed on the system or it simply will not work.

You can provide new translation tables for i/o layout and get it to work on other platforms. It might work on the host for a blade system. It will not under any circumstances work on an hpvm guest.

Translation tables:

super.translate.dat

—data—

sprotte@mngp01:/home/sprotte $ cat super.translate.dat
11:8:SD64B
10:9:SD64B
9:10:SD64B
8:12:SD64B
7:13:SD64B
6:14:SD64B
5:6:SD64B
4:5:SD64B
3:4:SD64B
2:2:SD64B
1:1:SD64B
0:0:SD64B
1:8:rp8420
2:10:rp8420
3:12:rp8420
4:14:rp8420
5:6:rp8420
6:4:rp8420
7:2:rp8420
8:1:rp8420

—end data—-

router.macadd.dat

This file is specific to your vlan and router configuration. It uses linkloop to confirm network connectivity. This portion of the final script can be commented out. the data below is altered due to corporate security concerns.

—data—

sprotte@mngp01:/home/sprotte $ cat router.macadd.dat
192.168.128.1:0x00000c07ac0a:vlan4:HP-UX Production
192.165.138.1:0x00000c07ac8a:vlan118: Peoplesoft
192.170.12.1:0X001ae24a1d00:vlan30: Replica Network

—end data—

The script:

—begin script—

DF=”super.translate.dat”
MA=”router.macadd.dat”

typeset MYDIR=/var/tmp/syslayout
typeset MYPAGE=mypage
typeset MYDATA=mydata
typeset IDX_HTML=syslayout.html

writehtml (){
while [ $# -gt 0 ]
do
echo “<td>${1}</td>” >> ${IDX_HTML}

shift
done
echo “<tr>” >> ${IDX_HTML}
}

cat -<<!EOF > ${IDX_HTML}
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN”>
<title>Dana IT Unix System documentation</title>
<BODY>
<TABLE style=”WIDTH: 100%; COLOR: rgb(0,0,0); TEXT-ALIGN: left” cellSpacing=2
cellPadding=2 border=0>
<TBODY>
<TR>
<td width=”200″><img
style=”border-width: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px;” alt=”Dana”
src=”dana_logo.jpg”> </td>
<td style=”font-weight: bold;”><big><big>Dana
IT
Unix:
Documentation</big></big></td>

<TD style=”VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; TEXT-ALIGN: center” colSpan=7><BIG
style=”FONT-FAMILY: helvetica,arial,sans-serif”><BIG>Dana IT system I/O Layout.</BIG></BIG><BR></TD></TR>
!EOF

# colum layout # Path       slot MAC Address    lan  ipaddress      vlan   linkstatus

sysname=$(uname -n)
this_cell=$(vparstatus -p $sysname -v |awk ‘/Boot processor/ {print $4}’ |awk -F’\.’ ‘{print $1}’)

# echo $this_cell

this_par=$(parstatus -c 0 |awk ‘/cell’$this_cell’/ {print $9}’)

nparname=$(/usr/sbin/parstatus -P |awk “/^$this_par/ {if(pname == 1) {print}};/Partition Name/ {pname=1}”|awk ‘/’$this_par’ / {print $6}’)

#echo “Diag nparname: ${nparname}”

complexname=$(/usr/sbin/parstatus -X |awk “/Complex Name/”)
cellind=”cell${this_par}”

nparinfo=$(/usr/sbin/parstatus -P |awk “/^$this_par/ {if(pname == 1) {print}};/Partition Name/ {pname=1}”)
# model needs to be determineed
OS=$(uname -r)
if [ “$OS” = “B.11.31” ]
then
mod=$(model | awk ‘{ print $5 }’)
else
mod=$(model | awk -F/ ‘{ print $3}’)
fi

hn=$(hostname)

this_cell=$(vparstatus -p ${hn} -v |awk ‘/Boot processor/ {print $4}’ |awk -F’\.’ ‘{print $1}’)

echo $this_cell

this_par=$(parstatus -c 0 |awk ‘/cell’$this_cell’/ {print $9}’)

/usr/sbin/parstatus -P |awk “/cell/ {if(pname == 1) {print}};/Partition Name/ {pname=1}”|awk ‘/’$this_par’ / {print $6}’

hn=$(hostname)
lhn=”${hn}.dana.com”
echo “Host name: ${lhn}”
writehtml “Host name:” ${lhn}
echo “Model number is: $mod”
writehtml “Model number:” ${mod}
#echo “<td>$complexname</td><td>$nparname</td><tr>” >>  ${IDX_HTML}
writehtml “${complexname}” ${nparname}
echo “Model number is: $mod”
pbootpath=$(parstatus -p 0 -V |awk -F: ‘/Primary Boot Path/ {print $2}’)

echo “Primary boot path: ${pbootpath}”
writehtml “Primary boot path:” ${pbootpath}
#echo “<td>$complexname</td><td>$nparnam</td><tr>” >>  ${IDX_HTML}
# echo “<td>Path</td><td>slot</td><td>MAC Address</td><td>lan</td><td>IP Address</td><td>vlan</td><td>Link Status</td><tr>” >>  ${IDX_HTML}
writehtml Path slot MAC_Address lan IP_Address vlan Link_Status

#echo “$nparinfo”
# echo “Path        slot MAC         lan     check    ip”
# 2/0/5/1/0/6/1 4 0x002264E4948B lan1 10.8.128.162
echo  “Path       slot MAC Address    lan  ipaddress      vlan   linkstatus”

/usr/sbin/ioscan -fnk | awk ‘/^lan/ {print $3}’ |while read -r path
do
ip=””;
echo $path  | sed ‘s/\// /g’ | read p1 p2 p3 p4 p5 p6 p7
macaddy=$(lanscan | awk ‘{if($1 == “‘${path}'”) print $2}’)
lanid=$(lanscan | awk ‘{if($1 == “‘${path}'”) print $5}’)
plan=$(lanscan | awk ‘{if($1 == “‘${path}'”) print $3}’)
lchk=$(/usr/sbin/linkloop -i $plan $macaddy 2>/dev/null | grep “OK”)
# If linkloop produces postive results then see if there is an ip address
ip=”IP not set”
if [ -n “$lchk” ]
then
# echo “lchk not null. running ifconfig command”
ip=$(/usr/sbin/ifconfig $lanid | grep netmask | awk ‘{print $2}’)
fi
# roll through the router table and see if you can establish
# linkloop with the gateway
DRMAC=”No link..”
DVLAN=”Not found”
#while [[ “$value” != “val1” || “$value” != “val2” || “$value” != “val3” ]]
while read -r DL
do
rmacaddy=$(echo $DL | awk -F: ‘{print $2}’)
rvlan=$(echo $DL | awk -F: ‘{print $3}’)
rlchk=$(/usr/sbin/linkloop -i $plan $rmacaddy 2>/dev/null | grep “OK”)
if [ -n “$rlchk” ]
then
# echo “rlchk not null. setting vlan information.”
DRMAC=${rmacaddy}
DVLAN=${rvlan}
break;
fi
done < $MA

#  echo “${path} ${p7} ${macaddy} ${lanid} ${lchk} ${ip} ”
#p1=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $1}’);
#p2=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $2}’);
#p3=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $3}’);
#p4=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $4}’);
#p5=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $5}’);
#p6=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $6}’);
#p7=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $7}’);

portpath=$(echo $path | awk -F/ ‘{print $3}’)
actualport=$(awk -F: ‘{if($2 == “‘${portpath}'” && $3 == “‘$mod'”) print $1}’ ${DF})

# echo “Actual path: ${p1} ${p2} ${p3} ${p4} ${p5} ${p6} ${p7}  ${actualport} ${ip} ${macaddy} ${lanid} ${ip}”
echo “${path} ${actualport} ${macaddy} ${lanid} ${ip}   ${DVLAN}   ${DRMAC}”
# echo “<td>${path}</td><td>${actualport}</td><td>${macaddy}</td><td>${lanid}</td><td>${ip}</td><td>${DVLAN}</td><td>${DRMAC}</td><tr>” >> ${IDX_HTML}
writehtml ${path} ${actualport} ${macaddy} ${lanid} ${ip} ${DVLAN} ${DRMAC}
done

echo “Fiber Channel….”
# echo “<td>Fiber Channel….</td><tr>” >> ${IDX_HTML}
writehtml  “Fiber Channel”
echo “PATH       slot Device… Status spd Hardware address”
# echo “<td>PATH</td><td>slot</td><td>Device</td><td>Status</td><td>speed</td><td>Hardware address</td><tr>” >>  ${IDX_HTML}
writehtml PATH slot Device Status speed Hardware address
#/usr/sbin/ioscan -fnCfc | grep fcd | awk ‘{print $3}’ |while read -r path
/usr/sbin/ioscan -fnk | awk ‘/^fc / {hw=$3;getline;print hw,$1}’ |while read -r hw devfile
do
#   echo “diag ${hw} dev file … ${devfile}”
port=$(echo $hw | awk -F/ ‘{print $3}’)
OSTAT=$(fcmsutil $devfile | awk ‘/ONLINE/  {print $4}’)
LSPD=$(fcmsutil $devfile | awk ‘/Link Speed/  {print $4}’)
WWN=$(fcmsutil $devfile | awk ‘/N_Port Port World Wide Name/  {print $7}’)
#  OSTAT=$(fcmsutil /dev/fcd1 | awk ‘/ONLINE/  {print $4}’)
#  LSPD=$(fcmsutil /dev/fcd1 | awk ‘/Link Speed/  {print $4}’)
#  WWN=$(fcmsutil /dev/fcd1 | awk ‘/N_Port Port World Wide Name/  {print $7}’)
actualport=$(awk -F: ‘{if($2 == “‘${port}'” && $3 == “‘$mod'”) print $1}’ ${DF})
echo “$hw ${actualport} $devfile ${OSTAT} ${LSPD} ${WWN}”
#echo “<td>$hw</td><td>${actualport}</td> <td>$devfile</td><td>${OSTAT}</td><td>${LSPD}</td> <td>${WWN}</td><tr>” >>  ${IDX_HTML}
writehtml ${hw} ${actualport} ${devfile} ${OSTAT} ${LSPD} ${WWN}
done

#awk -F: ‘{printf(“%8s %5s %4s\n”,$1,$3,$4)}’ steve
#2/0/5/1/0/6/0
#2/0/5/1/0/6/1

cat -<< !EOF >> ${IDX_HTML}
<TR></TR></TBODY></TABLE></BODY></HTML>
!EOF

chmod a+r ${IDX_HTML}
# Added to copy the data file to my home directory for diagnosis.
cp syslayout.html /home/sprotte
chmod a+r /home/sprotte/syslayout.html

—end script—

Your mileage may vary. You will have to customize this script.

There is html based output.

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20 Oct 09 HP-UX Integrity Software mirror procedure

This was written by a former colleague. It is better than anything else I have seen. SEP

Mirroring a Boot Disk with LVM on HP-UX 11i for HP Integrity

Servers

The following diagram shows the disk layout of a boot disk. The disk

contains a Master Boot Record (MBR) and Extensible Firmware

Interface (EFI) partition tables that point to each of the partitions. The

idisk

command is used to create the partitions (see idisk (1M)).

Figure 6-5 Example LVM Disk Layout on HP Integrity Server

Before starting the procedure, make sure that add-on product HP

MirrorDisk/UX (B5403BA) is installed. This product is an extra-cost

product available on the HP-UX 11i application release media. For

example:

swlist -l fileset | grep -i mirror

LVM.LVM-MIRROR-RUN B.11.22 LVM Mirror

Step 1.

file.

Partition the disk using the idisk command and a partition description

a.

Create a partition description file. For example:

vi /tmp/idf

In this example the partition description file contains:

3

EFI 500MB

HPUX 100%

HPSP 400MB

NOTE

an EFI partition, an HP-UX partition, and an HP Service partition.

Boot disks of earlier HP Integrity Servers may have an EFI partition

of only 100MB and may not contain the HPSP partition.

The values in the example represent a boot disk with three partitions:

b.

Partition the disk using idisk and your partition description file:

idisk -f /tmp/idf -w /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0

c.

To verify you can run:

idisk /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0

Step 2.

the partitions. For example:

Use the insf command with the -e option to create the device files for all

insf -e -H 0/18/1/2/0.0.1.0

You should now have eight device files for this disk:

/dev/[r]dsk/c?t?d?

(This refers to the entire disk)

/dev/[r]dsk/c?t?d?s1

(This refers to the EFI partition)

/dev/[r]dsk/c?t?d?s2

(This will be the HP-UX partition)

/dev/[r]dsk/c?t?d?s3

(This refers to the Service partition)

Step 3.

disk:

Use pvcreate to make the HP-UX partition of the disk an LVMmanaged

pvcreate -B /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0s2

Step 4.

Add the disk to vg00:

vgextend vg00 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

Step 5.

Place the boot files on the disk using mkboot:

mkboot -e -l /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0

Step 6.

Copy any autoboot file from the original boot disk to this one.

a.

partition to the current directory. Make sure to use the device file

with the

Use efi_cp to copy the AUTO file from the original boot disk’s EFIs1 suffix, as it refers to the EFI partition:

efi_cp -d /dev/rdsk/cntndns1 -u /efi/hpux/auto ./AUTO

b.

partition:

Copy the file from the current directory into the new disk’s EFI

efi_cp -d /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0s1 ./AUTO /efi/hpux/auto

Step 7.

volume group onto the desired physical volume. The logical volumes

must be extended in the same order that they are configured on the

original boot disk. Use the

determine the list of logical volumes and their order. For example:

Use the lvextend command to mirror each logical volume in the rootpvdisplay command with the -v option to

pvdisplay -v /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s2 | grep ’current.*0000$’

00000 current /dev/vg00/lvol1 00000

00038 current /dev/vg00/lvol2 00000

00550 current /dev/vg00/lvol3 00000

00583 current /dev/vg00/lvol4 00000

00608 current /dev/vg00/lvol5 00000

00611 current /dev/vg00/lvol6 00000

00923 current /dev/vg00/lvol7 00000

01252 current /dev/vg00/lvol8 00000

In this example, mirror the logical volumes as follows:

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol1 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol2 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol3 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lv0l4 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol5 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol6 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol7 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol8 /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

If

lvextend fails with following message:

“m”: Illegal option

then HP MirrorDisk/UX is not installed.

Step 8.

Update the root volume group information:

lvlnboot -R /dev/vg00

Step 9.

disk and that the boot, root, and swap logical volumes appear to be on

both disks:

Display the BDRA. Verify that the mirrored disk is displayed as a boot

lvlnboot –v

Step 10.

Specify the mirror disk as the alternate boot path in nonvolatile memory:

setboot -a path_to_disk

Step 11.

text editor:

Add a line to /stand/bootconf for the new boot disk using vi or another

vi /stand/bootconf

l /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2

where

l denotes LVM.

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09 Sep 09 Case Study: Capacity & Migration planning for a small organization

This is our first case study. The events leading up to it occur between 1998 and 2002. It is a real life case study based on my experience. For legal reasons, I can not identify the organization. It is a charity that raises now around $100 million, 92% of funds raised go to actual charitable work. 8% is overhead. IT infrastructure is overhead, even though it is critical to actually raising funds.

From 1991-2005 I worked at this charity in IT, first as a programmer analyst, then as a dba, finally becoming the backup Unix Admin in 1998 and the full time Unix Admin in 2000. The organization ran its legacy fund raising systems on a pair of D class HP-UX systems. The back end database was Software AG adabas. The user fund raising community wanted to have an sql like ability to look into the database and run queries. they wanted flexible use of strategic data. An attempt was made in early 1997 to install a sql front end, but it did not provide acceptable results.

An internal study was done and it was decided in late 1997 to migrate legacy systems to a web based front end, with Oracle as the back end database, Oracle Application Server using forms and reports to build applications. Initially no plan was made to migrate to stronger hardware, due to the assurance from Oracle that their software would run on the existing infrastructure.

By 2000 it was obvious that this was not true. Though the database server itself ran acceptably, there was not sufficient memory or disk capacity to run the application server. So I was asked to prepare a plan to migrate legacy systems. Here were the guidelines:

  • To run three environments, to be described below, each with a database server, an application server and forms and reports development tools on them.
  • Sandbox was to be used to test OS patches, Oracle patches, and tools upgrades. It was to belong to the systems administrator who was permitted to restart this system on short or no notice.
  • The development environment was to be where the developers were to develop code. It needed to be stable and available 100% during normal development hours 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Any changes made to his system were first to be vetted on the sandbox system.
  • The production system had the same uptime requirements accept that all changes needed to be vetted first on the other two systems.
  • The hardware was to be the same model for all the systems. This was defined to avoid hardware surprises. Only the production system needed to be at full capacity. the other systems were to be the same to permit realistic load testing.
  • Databases would be hosted on SAN disk with an HBA fiber channel connection. Systems were to boot locally.

Overall, I thought this was a solid foundation. Some of the points were made by management, some were suggested by me.

The following basic technical requirements were developed:

  • Overall database needed to be approximately 5 GB for server. Actual use hit 15 GB by 2005. This growth factor was planned.
  • Oracle Server, one instance had to run on each server.
  • Oracle Application server one instance had to run on each server.
  • Legacy applications Natural/Software AG Adabas needed to run on each server.
  • Server configuration needs to be manged and tracked responsibly.
  • HP-UX bi-annual updates needed to be installed in a timely basis after quality assurance.
  • The replacement cycle on hardware would be 3-5 years to maintain cost savings provided by being under warranty (First three years)

Deployment Diagram

Server Deployment

Other Relevant facts on the decision making process.

  • HP Hardware and Software agreements were running over $30,000 per year on existing infrastructure.
  • Much of the cost was hardware support due to the age and near obsolescence of the hardware.
  • Significant savings could be obtained by using current hardware that was under warranty.
  • Systems would be configured and used to provide a disaster recovery solution.

Three vendors were picked to provide proposals. All ended up recommending HP-9000 L2000(later renamed rp5450) servers. Here are the highlights:

  • rp5450 systems with 2 GB system memory.
  • 146 GB dual disks to server as boot disks with software mirroring.
  • 2 CPU would be installed per server.
  • Memory capacity and purchase was planned to enable an upgrade to 8 GB without replacing exiting memory.
  • Two HBA Fiber channel cards provided per machine to provide redundancy and fail over.
  • A capital budget request was made showing that support cost savings would over the course of 4 years, completely recover the cost of the systems.
  • Systems would each have a Ultirum tape drive, for locally provided backups and Ignite-UX make_tape_recovery backups as part of the DR plan.
  • Systems had two Gigabit Network Interface cards.
  • Systems would have a private network for use in Ignite backup, recovery and system replication.
  • Systems were to be delivered with HP-UX 11.11
  • HP provided RAC and UPS and PDU were specified.

How it went:

  • Systems were delivered in May of 2002.
  • Initial OS install began immediately. Systems were initially delivered with HP-UX 11.00. We delayed start of installation until correct media was provided.
  • All three systems were installed with a base OS to insure that hardware was working.
  • OS patch requirements for Oracle, security and bi-annual updates were installed on the sand box. It was decided that Ignite Golden Image would be used to replicate the sand box configuration, once a stable configuration was found.
  • Significant problems were encountered with the Oracle and Oracle Application Server installations. The version was changed twice. Several major Oracle patch sets had to be installed to deal with “show stopper” bugs that were encountered.
  • After the September 11 attacks in New York City in 2001, a security review was conducted and the deployment plan was modified to include improved security. Several rounds of patching and tools testing occurred on the OS level.
  • In December of 2002, the application development team notified us that they were satisfied with the sandbox and asked that an Ignite image be made and transferred to the development system.
  • In January-February of 2003 Imaging was done and the system was replicated. There were OS problems with the Ignite replication that took several weeks to work out.
  • Several changes were requested by the development staff. They were tested on the sand box and then deployed on the development system.
  • An Ignite central server was built on the sand box to handle images which were shared on NFS and available for use after booting of the sandbox Ignite configuration.
  • In June of 2003 after several change cycles the configuration was approved for deployment.
  • Ignite replication was completed on the production environment using the sandbox, which had been frozen for this purpose as the image template.
  • In August of 2003 all legacy systems were cut over to the rp5450 systems. HR would be migrated 18 months later due to Integration issues.
  • In the early of 2004 due to performance and memory use issues all systems were upgraded to 8 GB of system RAM.
  • For the year 2004 there was no downtime in production systems during normal business hours.
  • Weekly Ignite tape backups were taken on all systems and network based backup to shared NFS was used as a secondary DR method.
  • In February of 2004 a DR test was run at the HP Performance center and we successfully migrated a sandbox image to an rp5470 server in the HP infrastructure. Legacy systems were tested and approved as functional.

Note: This document was designed entirely using the wordpress interface and a Linux system. The diagram was created with a free Linux alternative to visio called dia. The tool is in evaluation, and might be replaced. Still a pretty good start. Cost to produce this environment in licensing fees?: Zero dollars.

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04 Sep 09 Creating Logical Volumes and Filesystems

Quick and Dirty Example here.

In our last example, we created a volume group vg03. It had thee disk, we expanded it to 4 because we planned proper capacity.

Our volume group now consists of 4 disks.

We are asked to create an approximately 10 GB files system in this SAN based volume group.

vgdisplay /dev/vg03

vgdisplay -v /dev/vg03

< Insert vgdisplay example here>

HP vgdisplay documentation link (Note this tends to change. I can’t help it if HP breaks the links)

This will show an empty volume group as we have not created any logical volumes

pvdisplay /dev/dsk/c10d0t1

… repeat for other disks …

<Insert pvdisplay examples here>

HP pvdisplay document link

Make sure nothing is on them.

Turns out 10 GB will fit quite nicely on a single disk. Since this is a SAN based disk, we need not worry here about raid configuration. If you are hosting an oracle rdbms, you should make sure the SAN admin sets up data, index and rollback as raid 1 or raid 10 to insure good performance.

lvcreate /dev/vg03

# Creates an empty logical volume on vg03. Uses default naming.

You can also do it this way if you like names.

lvcreate /dev/vg03 -n mydata

lvextend -L 10240 /dev/vg03/mydata /dev/dsk/c10t0d1

# This command creates an approximately 1024 MB logical volume and defines the disk it goes on. Always define the disk. Don’t let LVM or SAM decide where your data is going to go. Plan in advance. Note that LVM for Linux which is a feature port and not a binary recompile does let you define size 10 GB or 10240 MB. Still waiting for that feature on LVM for HP-UX.

newfs -F vxfs -o largefiles /dev/vg03/rmydata

# Why largefiles? Databases are big and the default limit on a file size in a file system is 2 GB. That is too small. I almost always set up my file systems these days for largefiles unless the file system itself is less than 2 GB

# Create a mount point.

mkdir /mydata

# mount it.

mount /dev/vg03/mydata /mydata

# This does not set an optimal JFS logging and recovery options, but that is a different article

bdf

# See if its there and the right capacity.

Next article: Edit /etc/fstab and set permanent mount options.

NOTE: This article needs to be checked and have vgdisplay and pvdisplay and other examples inserted into it.

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04 Sep 09 LVM Volume Group Create. High Capacity VGlvm

Volume group creation, done right need only be done once to last a long time. A few simple steps can make it a process you do once and then enjoy the long term benefits.

Step one is a little homework. Take a reasonable estimate at how many physical volumes the volume group is going to contain. Why is this important? Because by default lvm allocates resources as if there will be 255 physical volumes. Most volume groups don’t see that many disks, and the overall capacity is impacted by the default. For this example, we will pick a small volume group that is never anticipated to exceed 10 physical volumes. We will set the maximum volumes to 25 to have a fair amount of additional capacity but to more efficiently allocate scarce resources.

Now th fun begins. We will create a volume group called vg03

Discover the new disks, important if LUNS have been presented to the system.

insf -C disk (may not be needed on HP-UX 11.31)

ioscan -fnC disk

ioscan shows three disks for this example.

/dev/rdsk/c10t0d1 /dev/rdsk/c10t0d2 /dev/rdsk/c10t0d3

cd /dev

mkdir vg03

mknod /dev/vg03/group c 64 0x030000

# We have created a device file for the volume group.

We need to pvcreate the disks, which lablels the disk for use by LVM

pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c10t0d1

pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c10t0d2

pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c10t0d3

vgcreate -p25 /dev/vg03 /dev/dsk/c10t0d1 /dev/dsk/c12t0d1 /dev/dsk/c10t0d3

# alternative vgcreate -e 65535 -s 16 /dev/vg10 /dev/dsk/c10t0d1 /dev/dsk/c12t0d1 /dev/dsk/c16t0d1 /dev/dsk/c17t0d1

The option -s lets us set a larger PE size which can also increase capacity.

Now inevitably someone is going to decide to add another disk to this volume group. It may be immediately or it may be down the road. We are prepared.

The SAN admin and project manager want to create a scratch area within the volume group for oracle backups to disk.

They present a new lun disk /dev/rdsk/c16t0d5

We respond like lightning.

insf -C disk

ioscan -fnC disk

pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c16t0d5

vgextend vg03 /dev/dsk/c16t0d5

The disk is ready for use.

Different article for how we set up logical volumes and a file system.

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